SavATree - Tree Shrub and Lawn Care
TIPS & RESOURCES

Helping Your Lawn Help Itself

Spring and summer tips to help your lawn look its very best throughout the season

Is your blade sharp?

Make sure your mower blade is sharp. This not only prevents the tearing of grass blades, but also helps limit the spread of leftover fungal spores from last year’s mowing. Remember, a crisp, clean cut will help prevent the “brown tip” appearance and reduce the chance of disease spore spread.

The right way to mow

Mowing to a finished cut height of 3-3.5 inches throughout the spring and summer is generally recommended. As a result, the lawn will need less water, be more resistant to weeds and greener in color.

Mow in a uniform, yet differing pattern each mowing. Go back and forth in neat rows, not around in a circle. Overlap the area before for a smoother cut, while covering areas you may have missed.

Lawn Spraying

Encourage root growth

Your landscape will thrive with soil that is alive with beneficial microbes. Healthy soils = healthy root systems which in turn = healthy plants, trees, shrubs and grass.

Remove the mower bag and “mulch” the nutrients from the clippings back into the soil (they also contain moisture). Deep roots allow better absorption of water and nutrients in the grass, while providing greater resistance to heat, drought and diseases.

Don’t forget fertilizer

Neglect or poor cultural practices contribute to excessive weeds in your lawn. With proper fertilization, watering and mowing, you’ll achieve optimal results all season.

Start fertilizing in the spring. Weeds are best controlled in midspring, late spring, and fall when they’re growing at the quickest rates. Spot treatments, or pulling weeds by hand, may need to be done in between applications as completely eliminating weeds on your property is unrealistic.

Get a handle on watering

Water when the lawn needs it, not on a set schedule. Proper watering requires paying close attention to the weather. Adjust watering times as needed based on changing conditions throughout the growing season.

 

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